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Southern Sweet Tea Sangria

Sweet tea sangria takes the southern staple to the next level with the addition of Moscato and lots of fruit. It's easy to adjust the sweetness to your preference.

A pitcher of sweet tea sangria

It's another Progressive Eats meal, and this time, we're having Southern cuisine, thanks to our host Karen of Karen's Kitchen Stories.

One of my favorite recipes from the south is sweet tea. How does a born-and-raised Philadelphian come to love sweet tea? My great-uncle was in town, visiting from Georgia. He made a batch, and I was hooked.

A pitcher of sweet tea sangria with a mason jar of sangria in the background

While you could use store-bought iced tea to make this recipe (use unsweetened if you're going to add your own simple syrup), I love making the tea from scratch.

For this batch of sangria, I used some loose tea leaves from The Art of Tea, the same summer peach blend I used to make peach sweet tea ice cream a few years back.

An overhead shot of a mason jar of sangria, with the pitcher nearby

Of course, it only made sense to add peach slices (and some mixed berries) to the sangria. Being February, the fruit isn't in season, so I used frozen, which has the added bonus of keeping the sangria cold while I sip.

The recipe below for simple syrup will make slightly more than a cupful, so if you prefer a really sweet tea, you can add more syrup. A level cupful was plenty for me.

An overhead shot of a mason jar of sweet tea sangria, with two yellow-and-white striped paper straws

For the wine, I used a Moscato, an Italian fizzy white wine. Look for one that has notes similar to the flavors you plan to include in your sangria, whether those come from flavored tea leaves or the fruit.

On a funny note, my husband knows I want to drop some weight, and what's worked for me in the past is avoiding all carbs for two weeks, then gradually re-introducing whole grains into my meals (the South Beach Diet). He asked if carbs included alcohol, while watching me make this sangria.

Maybe I'll start that diet next week ... Can't let all this delicious sangria go to waste!

An overhead view of a mason jar of sweet tea sangria

Sweet Tea Sangria

Yield: 12 servings
Prep Time: 20 minutes
Cook Time: 5 minutes
Total Time: 25 minutes

Sweet tea sangria takes the southern staple to the next level with the addition of Moscato and lots of fruit. It's easy to adjust the sweetness to your preference.

Ingredients

For the simple syrup

  • ¾ cup sugar
  • ¾ cup water

For the tea

  • 3 tbsp loose tea leaves (or 2 to 4 standard tea bags)
  • 64 oz water

For the sangria

  • 750 mL moscato white wine
  • 1 cup sliced peaches (fresh or frozen)
  • 1 cup mixed berries (fresh or frozen)

Instructions

Make the simple syrup

  1. Place the water and sugar in a small saucepan. Bring to a boil over high heat.
  2. Once the water comes to a boil, remove from the heat, and set aside to cool to room temperature.
  3. Store in an airtight container in the refrigerator if not making the sangria the same day (can be made a day ahead).

Make the tea

  1. Heat the water just to simmering (about 200 degrees). Do not boil.
  2. Remove the water from the heat and add the loose tea leaves, or the tea bags. Steep for 3 to 5 minutes.
  3. Strain out the loose tea leaves, or remove the tea bags (do not squeeze) and discard.
  4. Cool the tea to room temperature.

Make the sangria

  1. In a large pitcher, combine the fruit.
  2. Pour in 1 cup of the simple syrup, the tea, and the moscato.
  3. Chill in the refrigerator at least 4 hours before serving, or overnight.

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Nutrition Information:
Yield: 12 servings Serving Size: 1 serving
Amount Per Serving: Calories: 121Total Fat: 0gSaturated Fat: 0gTrans Fat: 0gUnsaturated Fat: 0gCholesterol: 0mgSodium: 8mgCarbohydrates: 19gFiber: 1gSugar: 14gProtein: 0g

I am not a certified nutritionist. This nutrition information is automatically calculated by third party software and is meant as a guideline only.

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Food From the South

Cocktails
Appetizers
Bread
Main Courses
Side Dishes
Desserts
Welcome to Progressive Eats, our virtual version of a Progressive Dinner Party. Each recipe in our menu this month features food from the South, and our host is Karen who blogs at Karen's Kitchen Stories.

If you're unfamiliar with the concept, a progressive dinner involves going from house to house, enjoying a different course at each location. With Progressive Eats it’s a virtual party. A theme is chosen each month, members share recipes suitable for a delicious meal or party, and you can hop from blog to blog to check them out. Come along and see all of the delicious dishes from the South!
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Barbara | Creative Culinary

Monday 18th of March 2019

Wow this sounds fantastic. I spent ten lovely years in the South with fond memories of their sweetened tea; I know I would love it with Sangria too!

Beth (OMG! Yummy)

Tuesday 26th of February 2019

what a fun twist on sangria and iced tea. Can't wait to get warm enough to try this!

susan | the wimpy vegetarian

Tuesday 26th of February 2019

This looks incredibly refreshing! When the weather warms up here, I would love to make this!

Jane

Tuesday 26th of February 2019

What a great way to change up sweet tea - I love the idea of the fresh fruit and wine! This would be so great all summer long and it's on my must make list now!!

Laura @motherwouldknow

Tuesday 26th of February 2019

LIke you, I've been thinking about how to drop a few pounds. But between my Derby Pie bars and your fun sweet tea sangria, I guess that plan will have to be put to the side:) I could save this recipe for warmer weather, but it may just be too good to save for summer.

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